It’s time for Africa!

The official launch of South Africa’s first shipment and preferential trading under the African Continental Free Trade Agreement (AfCFTA) on 31 January 2024, at the Port of Durban goes beyond a feather in the cap for trade and economic growth. It sign…


The official launch of South Africa’s first shipment and preferential trading under the African Continental Free Trade Agreement (AfCFTA) on 31 January 2024, at the Port of Durban goes beyond a feather in the cap for trade and economic growth. It signals the unyielding African spirit which has prevailed against the injustices that plagued our continent, including colonialism and apartheid.

Our liberation from these wrongs took the strength of all African nations and together we proved that we could overcome insurmountable obstacles to create a brighter future for the continent.

Despite the devastation over centuries, we have redefined Africa as a continental force and transformed our nation states to be independent. We have preserved our unique African heritage and identities, and capitalised on our strengths as we develop our nations.

The African Union (AU) serves as the mantra for the development of African nations. Formerly known as the Organisation of African Unity (OAU), the unified vision for a bette
r future for all Africans began on 25 May 1963, when leaders of African countries joined forces to form the OAU, to advance democracy and African development.

Founded on the principles of freedom, equality, justice, and dignity, it strived to end the legacy of suffering, political instability and injustice for all Africans.

‘We all want a united Africa, united not only in our concept of what unity connotes, but united in our common desire to move forward together in dealing with all the problems that can best be solved only on a continental basis’. These were the sentiments of Kwame Nkrumah, first prime minister of Ghana and Pan African Leader who contributed to the formation of the OAU.

To prioritise the acceleration of African economic growth through increased cooperation and integration of African states, the OAU was relaunched as the African Union (AU) during 2002.

Since its formation, the AU has sought to protect the independence of African states and ensure their development, playing a critical role
in steering the continent through the unprecedented challenge of COVID-19.

While we have much to celebrate as a continent, we remain cognisant that much still needs to be done to better Africa. This includes finding amicable solutions to conflicts that continue to plague certain parts of the continent.

Commitment to political dialogue with a view to sustainable peace and stability is a critical lever in solving the challenges in Burundi, Democratic Republic of Congo, Libya, Mali and the Sahel, Somalia, Sudan and Western Sahara.

Together we can harness our collective energies and resources ensure to take our continent closer to the ultimate vision of being free of poverty and conflict. The AU’s flagship project of Agenda 2063, is a roadmap to our development over the next 50 years. This project prioritises African goals, including; equality, intra-regional trade, infrastructure and technology development.

The African Continental Free Trade Area is in line with Agenda 2063, which is aimed at deepening Afric
an economic integration.

Strong partnerships among African nations for inclusive socio-economic development is key to advancing the African Agenda. The African Continental Free Trade Area (AFCFTA) also presents opportunities for massive financial growth in Africa.

The AFCFTA is the world’s largest trade area which holds the potential to boost intra-African trade by over 50 percent and inject approximately $450 billion worth of investments into the African economy to help uplift 50 to 100 million people out of poverty by 2035.

By harnessing the strengths of all 55 nations on the continent, we will recover, become stronger and ensure African nations take their rightful place in the world. According to the African Development Bank, Africa’s economies remain resilient and Africa’s GDP is expected to stabilise in 2023-2024.

South Africa remains committed to Africa’s advancement and as the most industrialised economy on the continent we are actively working to facilitating intra-Africa trade through exports, en
hancing skills development, foreign direct investment and international cooperation.

A thriving African economy requires developed infrastructure to facilitate trade globally. South Africa is working to improve its rail and port efficiencies to drive economic growth and enable further economic opportunities across the continent.

We are also closely working with international organisations to grow investment, industrialisation and innovation across Africa. Our future is intrinsically linked to the continent, and we are aware that Africa’s growth will spur-on our own growth and bolster us to address the triple challenge of poverty, inequality and unemployment.

Let us all come together and play an active role in advancing Africa. Let us go beyond the dedicated Africa Month (May) to claiming the 21st century as the era for Africa’s revival and renewal!

Source: South African Government News Agency

Motshekga calls on everyone to participate in the 2024 SGB Elections

Basic Education Minister Angie Motshekga has called on eligible stakeholders, parents, teachers, non-teaching staff, learners in high schools, and community members to participate and have their say in the upcoming 2024 School Governing Body (SGB) Ele…


Basic Education Minister Angie Motshekga has called on eligible stakeholders, parents, teachers, non-teaching staff, learners in high schools, and community members to participate and have their say in the upcoming 2024 School Governing Body (SGB) Elections.

Motshekga was speaking during the launch of the 2024 School Governing Body (SGB) Elections Campaign in Pretoria on Monday.

The actual SGB elections will be held from 1 – 31 March 2024 in all ordinary public schools. By law, the department is required to conduct elections for SGBs every three years.

‘As we launch this campaign, I call upon each of you, parents, teachers, learners, and community members to join us in this crucial endeavour.

‘Engage with the process, educate yourselves and others and most importantly, exercise your right to vote. Your involvement is not just a contribution but a testament to your commitment to the future of our nation’s children.

‘My call to action today is simple yet powerful: get involved. Whether you choose to stand
for election or cast your vote, your contribution holds immense significance. It will not only impact the lives of our children but also shape the future of our nation,’ Motshekga said.

She said that research has consistently shown that schools with active SGBs excel across various metrics, including academic performance, learner wellbeing, and community engagement.

She said the correlation between engaged SGBs and school success is undeniable. Schools with high SGB participation report an average 20% higher pass rate than those with lower engagement.

Additionally, the Minister said that incidents of vandalism and truancy decrease significantly in schools with active governing bodies.

‘These are not just numbers; they are compelling evidence of the power of active participation. Our vision is for every school to harness this potential, translating active governance into tangible outcomes for our children.

‘Therefore, our campaign, ‘Empower, Engage, Educate’, aims to catalyse a shift. With a multifaceted
strategy leveraging both digital and traditional media, we intend to reach every corner of our society. From rural townships to bustling urban centres, our message is clear: your voice shapes the future,’ she said.

Sharing information

Motshekga told the media briefing that the campaign will provide comprehensive resources on the roles and significance of SGBs, the election process, and how every individual can contribute.

Workshops, informational pamphlets, and an interactive website will serve as conduits for this essential knowledge.

Motshekga said there will be a dialogue to foster understanding. The campaign will initiate conversations across communities, creating platforms for questions, discussions and sharing ideas.

The Minister said these dialogues will bridge gaps, dispel myths and build a shared vision for schools.

She said this is a moment that not only reflects the department’s commitment to democratic values but also underscores the collective responsibility towards the future of basic educ
ation in South Africa.

Building stronger schools

By law, School Governing Bodies are the backbone of school communities. They ensure schools are not merely institutions of learning but beacons of hope, character, and community spirit.

‘Their impact is profound and far-reaching, with roles encompassing financial management, policy formulation, and staff appointment.

‘In the coming months, we embark on a collective journey to shape the future of our education system, brick by democratic brick.

‘As we approach these elections, we are reminded of the significance of active participation. The vibrancy of our democracy is mirrored in the engagement of our school communities,’ Motshekga said.

The Minister further acknowledged the stark reality of past participation rates, which have not matched the department’s aspirations.

Despite the undeniable importance of SGBs, she said the turnout has lingered at around the 40% mark. ‘This is not just a missed opportunity; it’s a call to action.’

The Minister emphasise
d that SGBs serve as a vital link, fostering understanding and collaboration between schools and the communities they serve.

‘As we celebrate the achievements of the Class of 2023, weathering turbulent waters yet emerging with hope, their success speaks volumes.

‘In KwaZulu-Natal, where we witnessed a remarkable improvement in results, the unwavering support of SGBs played a pivotal role. This is a testament to the immense power of active and engaged school communities,’ the Minister said.

Motshekga emphasised that the upcoming elections carry immense weight because they represent not just an exercise in democracy but an opportunity for parents, educators, and community members to join hands and contribute to improving schools.

‘With this responsibility comes a clarion call: it’s time to raise our voices and shape the education we envision for our children. Transparency and inclusivity are our guiding principles to ensure every voice is heard.

‘The Department of Basic Education stands firmly committed to
conducting these elections with unwavering integrity,’ she said.

Throughout this month, the Department of Basic Education will share detailed information on the electoral process, nomination procedures, and critical dates.

The department is committed to ensuring that these elections are a model of democracy and accountability.

Source: South African Government News Agency

IRP 2023 public consultations

A cornerstone of our democracy over the past 30 years has been the participation of citizens in key policies and decisions that our country embarks on. This is in line with the country’s founding principle of building a participatory democracy and lis…


A cornerstone of our democracy over the past 30 years has been the participation of citizens in key policies and decisions that our country embarks on. This is in line with the country’s founding principle of building a participatory democracy and listening to the views of our citizens.

This approach is a Constitutional imperative that states that “people’s needs must be responded to, and the public must be encouraged to participate in policy-making’. It mandates all spheres of government to ensure that South Africans have a say in the way they are governed.

The involvement of citizens through public participation allows them to meaningfully influence the decisions that affect their lives. It also ensures greater co-operation, collaboration and the building of partnerships to improve the lives of people.

Government once again calls on citizens to make their voice heard on the future of our country’s energy supply by engaging with the Integrated Resource Plan (IRP 2023) that was released in January this yea
r for public comment.

The Department of Minerals and Energy published the draft IRP 2023 which maps out the future energy mix for the country so that it can solicit public comments on the various assumptions, scenarios and observations made in the plan.

Through their submissions, citizens will have a direct say in how the country addresses the current energy challenges. Submissions must be made on or before 23 February 2024 to the Director-General of the Department of Minerals and Energy.

Our nation’s Integrated Resource Plan is a living document that is continuously revised and updated as necessitated by changing circumstances. It was first promulgated in March 2011 and the last review of the IRP was done in 2019.

The 2023 update estimates South Africa’s long-term electricity demand and charts how this demand for energy can be met. It takes into account costs and our climate change commitments in meeting our country’s demand for electricity.

Through the plan we aim to balance energy generation with dema
nd, while also factoring in the environment and total cost of supply. The draft IRP 2023 is based on a scientific process that considers several scenarios and latest developments in the country’s electricity industry.

The updated plan sets out two-time horizons that includes interventions that will help us in the short-term up to 2030, and the energy mix the country will pursue to securing our long term energy supply until 2050.

In the period up to 2030, the plan focuses on addressing prevailing generation constraints and system requirements to close the energy supply gap. On the other hand, the period from 2031 to 2050 focuses on long-term electricity generation to achieve a resilient Net Zero electricity sector by 2050.

While the draft IRP 2023 acknowledges that there will be intermittent load shedding until 2028, it proposes bold interventions to stabilise the grid and over time increase energy generation through gas, wind, photovoltaic solar, and battery storage.

The most significant change relates to
the allocation for new gas-to-power, which has been increased from the 3 000 MW outlined in the IRP 2019 to 7 220 MW. It raises our installed base of gas and diesel generation to 11 050 MW in 2030, up from the 6 380 MW assumed in the current plan.

Over the longer-term, a power system energy mix that takes into account energy security, decarbonisation and low cost of energy is proposed. The plan notes that while renewable energy technology will help the country meet its decarbonisation goals, it remains costly and does not provide security of supply.

Power generation such as nuclear, renewables, clean coal and gas that can be immediately active when needed has been singled out to provide security of supply and assist our decarbonisation. Furthermore, our energy system will require a massive new build programme and scaling up of our transmission network between 2031 and 2050.

The energy plan shows government is committed to addressing our energy challenge and build a better tomorrow. We cannot however do it
alone and need citizens to play their part by engaging with the country’s energy plan.

In doing so every citizen can partner with us on changing our energy situation. Our nation has always been at its strongest when we work together as citizens and communities to effect change.

Source: South African Government News Agency

Limpopo police investigate fatal crash

The Limpopo Provincial Commissioner Lieutenant General, Thembi Hadebe, has ordered an immediate probe into the circumstances surrounding the fatal crash that claimed seven lives on the R101 between Mookgophong and Mokopane in the Waterberg District in…


The Limpopo Provincial Commissioner Lieutenant General, Thembi Hadebe, has ordered an immediate probe into the circumstances surrounding the fatal crash that claimed seven lives on the R101 between Mookgophong and Mokopane in the Waterberg District in the early hours of Sunday.

The accident involves members of the South African Police Service (SAPS) and a sedan motor vehicle.

According to reports, a Renault sedan collided head-on with a Toyota light delivery van, which was traveling from Mookgophong towards Mokopane.

All five people in the Renault sedan and two passengers from the SAPS Toyota light delivery van (a police officer and an inmate) died on the scene.

The driver of the SAPS vehicle, a sergeant, was rushed to the hospital and is currently receiving medical attention.

The cause of the horific accident is still unknown and is currently being investigated.

Hadebe has sent messages of condolences to the bereaved families and wished the driver a speedy recovery.

The passenger in the SAPS vehicle,
who died on the scene, was identified as Constable M.M. Makwela, who was attached to SAPS Naboomspruit.

The identity of the inmate, who also died at the scene, as well as the five deceased from the other vehicle, will be released as soon as the next of kin are notified.

Source: South African Government News Agency

Government activities for the week 12 to 16 February 2024

On Monday, 12 February, the Minister of Basic Education Angie Motshekga will launch the 2024 SGB Elections Campaign in Pretoria.

On Monday, 12 February, Minister of Tourism Patricia de Lille will address the Africa Air Expo at the Cape Town Internati…


On Monday, 12 February, the Minister of Basic Education Angie Motshekga will launch the 2024 SGB Elections Campaign in Pretoria.

On Monday, 12 February, Minister of Tourism Patricia de Lille will address the Africa Air Expo at the Cape Town International Convention Centre, Western Cape.

Also, on Monday leading though till Wednesday (12-14 February), the Agricultural Research Council in partnership with the Department of Agriculture, Land Reform, and Rural Development will host their first-ever joint annual conference at the ARC-Vegetable, Industrial and Industrial Medicinal Plants.

From Sunday 11 February up until Sunday, 18 February, Sport, Arts and Culture as well as the South African Football Association will host the Football for Humanity international showpiece at the Athlone stadium.

On Tuesday, 13 February, the Department of Health will observe the National Epilepsy Week.

Source: South African Government News Agency

Teenager allegedly drowns at Okafitu kaShipopyeniCheck your higher learning institution before you enrol

OSHAKATI: A 16-year-old boy, identified as Kamati Paulus, allegedly drowned in a pond at Okafitu kaShipopyeni village in the Omusati Region.

The Namibian Police Force (NamPol)’s Crime Investigation Coordinator for the region, Moses Simaho, confirmed …

OSHAKATI: A 16-year-old boy, identified as Kamati Paulus, allegedly drowned in a pond at Okafitu kaShipopyeni village in the Omusati Region.

The Namibian Police Force (NamPol)’s Crime Investigation Coordinator for the region, Moses Simaho, confirmed this to Nampa on Monday, saying that the incident occurred at around 22h28 on Sunday.

‘The deceased allegedly notified his siblings that he is going to take a bath at the water pond at around the afternoon hours. However, the parents noticed that the deceased did not return home until the evening hours and this prompted the family to search for him at the pond,’ he said.

He added that they later found the deceased’s trouser, backpack and sandals near the pond with visible footprint heading into the water.

Simaho indicated that after searching in the water, the deceased’s body was found.

No foul play is suspected and the body is kept at Outapi State Hospital’s Mortuary and will be transported to Okahao Police mortuary for a post-mortem.

Police investigation i
nto the matter continues.

Source: The Namibia Press Agency

South Africans have been warned not to fall for bogus local and international colleges and to check the authenticity of any higher learning institution before enrolling.

On Monday, the South African Qualification Authority (SAQA), Quality Council for Trades and Occupations (QCTO), Council on Higher Education (CHE) and Umalusi held a media briefing to address, amongst others, bogus institutions and fake qualifications.

SAQA CEO Nadia Starr urged the public to visit the authority’s website to check the validity of offerings at institutions.

‘Whilst SAQA does not deal directly with accreditation and by extension bogus colleges or institutions, the SAQA searchable website database is of course a useful tool for self-vetting the offering of learning institutions. In addition to checking their accreditation status, checking the legitimacy of their qualifications on our searchable database is quite easy and convenient.

‘Those wanting to vet an institution before they or their loved one leaves South Africa for fo
reign study, should use the SAQA service on our website called ‘check the status of foreign institutions,’ she said.

Turning to fake qualifications, Starr emphasised that SAQA undergoes a thorough process when verifying qualification achievement.

‘When it comes to fake and fraudulent qualification achievement, SAQA is front and centre as the only entity that holds all the verified national achievements and the regulatory entity that is mandated to engage foreign ministries to authenticate foreign qualification achievements.

‘Our process… is to confirm that the qualification is registered on the NQF [National Qualifications Framework], either national or the foreign NQF, that the institution was accredited to offer the qualification and that the graduate claiming the achievement did indeed achieve the qualification.

‘The last step… is usually the only step that some commercial vetting agencies do and this leaves employers with the risk of receiving an authenticated achievement from a bogus institution,’ sh
e said.

Starr added that if a qualification claimed by an individual is found to be ‘inauthentic or misrepresented’, SAQA refers that finding to relevant professional bodies and law enforcement agencies.

‘SAQA will further record such finding in the register of misrepresented qualifications and part qualifications, and in this regard, SAQA is liaising with the Department of Higher Education and Training and our quality councils… to provide for clear policy and regulations in the enforcement of the misrepresentation clauses. Misrepresentation qualifications can lead to legal repercussions for both the individual and the employer.

‘In the context of burgeoning academic fraud and misrepresentation, we hope this information will help the public make informed choices when they are considering study options in South Africa and abroad,’ Starr concluded.

Source: South African Government News Agency

Two Otjiwarongo management committee councillors resign

OTJIWARONGO: Two local authority councillors of the Otjiwarongo Municipality resigned from their positions at the Otjiwarongo Municipality’s management committee last week.

The two are Gideon Iiyambo of the Independent Patriots for Change (IPC) and S…


OTJIWARONGO: Two local authority councillors of the Otjiwarongo Municipality resigned from their positions at the Otjiwarongo Municipality’s management committee last week.

The two are Gideon Iiyambo of the Independent Patriots for Change (IPC) and Sebetius Guiteb of the Landless People’s Movement (LPM).

Guiteb was a full member of the management committee, while Iiyambo served as an additional member.

They now remain ordinary council members as of 08 February 2024.

They allegedly resigned after a lengthy disagreement between each other over the recruitment process of the Otjiwarongo Chief Executive Officer (CEO), which ended up interviewing one male candidate out of 47 applicants who applied for the position.

The Otjiwarongo CEO position has been vacant since July 2023 after Moses Matyayi left for greener pastures at the City of Windhoek.

Chairperson of the management committee at Otjiwarongo, Godhardt Hoko in an interview with Nampa on Sunday afternoon said he is aware of Iiyambo and Guiteb’s resignat
ions.

‘In their resignation letters they only cited a broken working trust, as well as their personal reasons as grounds for their resignations,’ said Hoko.

Hoko denied accusations of him bending requirements that led to only one candidate who made it to the interview on the position of CEO on 10 February 2024 at Otjiwarongo.

Hoko said there is nothing sinister for the panel to interview one candidate on the position, adding that it is a normal practice at the municipality.

Mayor Gottlieb Shivute on his part on Monday morning said the two councillors have been already replaced by councillor Ernst Muraranganda of the Popular Democratic Movement (PDM), who will serve on the committee as a full member, together with Hilde Jesaja and Hoko.

Jesaja, Shivute, Hoko and deputy mayor Julienda Kampungu are all from the Swapo Party.

Source: The Namibia Press Agency

Hanse-Himarwa remembers Geingob

WINDHOEK: Former Hardap Governor, Katrina Hanse-Himarwa, has described the late President Hage Geingob as generous and compassionate.

Her fondest memories with him, she said, include him droving to her house in Katutura to wish her strength after she…


WINDHOEK: Former Hardap Governor, Katrina Hanse-Himarwa, has described the late President Hage Geingob as generous and compassionate.

Her fondest memories with him, she said, include him droving to her house in Katutura to wish her strength after she was convicted of corruption.

‘After landing from an African Union (AU) meeting after I was convicted. How he drove to my house in Katutura to wish me strength, that I will never forget in my life. Which President will do that ever? He was true and sincere to himself and those whom he regarded as friends,’ Hanse-Himarwa told Nampa on sunday.

She was the Minister of Education, Arts and Culture from March 2015 to July 2019. Hanse-Himarwa was sentenced to pay a fine of N.dollars 50 000 or serve a direct prison sentence of 24 months after being found guilty in 2019 of wrongly and corruptly using her position as the Governor of the Hardap Region to make changes to the original list of mass housing beneficiaries for the benefit of two of her relatives in December 201
4.

Hanse-Himarwa added that Geingob shaped her career in many ways.

‘Every moment in his presence was a lifelong lesson. You wouldn’t be in Hage’s presence and leave without learning something. He was magnanimous. He was a man in a lion’s face with a lamb’s heart, generous in all his dealings, compassionate, inclusive and detribalised,’ Hanse-Himarwa added.

She further stressed that she has worked with Geingob as a local authority councilor and from her trade union days as a Namibia National Teachers Union (NANTU) member.

‘He wholly believed in women and youth empowerment. This is so clear in how he appointed youth and women since his presidency. He made deliberate efforts to promote women and youth at all levels,’ Hanse-Himarwa added.

Geingob died on 04 February in a Windhoek hospital.

Source: The Namibia Press Agency

Swapo members honour their late president

WINDHOEK: The late Dr Hage Geingob was a liberation hero, a symbol of unity, a skilled diplomat, negotiator, and administrator, as well as a Statesman who made a significant contribution to both the Swapo Party and the country of Namibia.

This is how…


WINDHOEK: The late Dr Hage Geingob was a liberation hero, a symbol of unity, a skilled diplomat, negotiator, and administrator, as well as a Statesman who made a significant contribution to both the Swapo Party and the country of Namibia.

This is how members and supporters of the ruling Swapo Party remembered their former party president and Namibian Head of State on Sunday night at a candlelight vigil held at the party’s headquarters here.

Geingob, 82, died in office from cancer complications on 04 February in Windhoek, and he will be buried on 25 February 2024.

Senior party leaders, including Swapo Vice President Netumbo Nandi-Ndaitwah, secretary-general Sophia Shaningwa, and Prime Minister Saara Kuugongelwa-Amadhila, paid luminous tributes during the candlelight vigil.

‘I have known Hage for 49 years and five months. And since we met for the first time in 1974, when three girls fresh from home were accommodated at his flat in Harlem, New York, our operational areas have been very close. And that is why
this is the one difficult moment for me to talk about, on this occasion when we are saying, ‘Comrade Hage is no more’,’ Nandi-Ndaitwah said.

She noted that Geingob joined Swapo during the formative years of the former liberation movement. ‘And throughout his entire life, he had committed himself to Swapo and the liberation of our country,’ she said, adding that Geingob never failed the party or the government in the different roles he served.

‘Every task that was given to him, he accomplished with great success. And this is the man we remember,’ Nandi-Ndaitwah said. She added that Geingob did not hesitate when he was tasked with leading a team to set up the Swapo machinery in preparation for the 1989 UN-supervised elections.

Nandi-Ndaitwah also remembered the role Geingob played in the establishment of the UN Council for Namibia in 1967.

She said that many Namibians in exile could not travel to many countries due to a lack of travel documents. And it was through the initiative of people like Geingob that
things changed when the UN Council for Namibia was established.

‘They were allowed to issue UN Council for Namibia passports that had facilitated the travel of Namibians. Before that, Namibians could travel only between Lusaka, Luanda, and Dar es Salaam, the only countries that allowed Namibians to travel on Swapo membership cards,’ she recalled.

Nandi-Ndaitwah worked closely with Geingob during his time as the director of the United Nations Institute for Namibia (UNIN) in Lusaka, Zambia. During that time, she was the Swapo representative for Namibia in central Africa, based in Lusaka. ‘Therefore, in that capacity, I also oversaw the activities of UNIN as far as Swapo was concerned. And I must tell you, I really enjoyed working with comrade Hage at that time,’ she said.

Geingob was elected Swapo’s third president in November 2017. He was re-elected to the same position in 2022 and was expected to lead the party through this year’s Presidential and National Assembly elections.

During his time of death, the
former president was serving his last five-year term in office, after first being elected Head of State in 2014.

‘I want to tell you that, and I am saying this with confidence, that as much as comrade Hage loved Swapo and the Namibian nation, his party Swapo equally loved him,’ Nandi-Ndaitwah said.

On her part, Prime Minister Kuugongelwa-Amadhila expressed that Namibia has lost ‘a visionary and revolutionary leader who dedicated his life to serving others.’

She said that Geingob’s tireless effort with other cadres at the UN resulted in the recognition of Swapo as the sole representative of the people of Namibia.

And Geingob ‘helped develop a pool of cadres that became critical in establishing our new independent republic. Many of those who took up leadership positions at different levels and different branches of Government and outside the public sector went through his hands as director of the United Nations Institute for Namibia,’ she said.

Also as the first prime minister of Namibia, Kuugongelwa-Amadh
ila said Geingob oversaw the establishment of the Namibian public service and ensured smooth integration under the policy of national reconciliation.

Shaningwa, Swapo’s SG said the news of Geingob’s passing hit the Swapo family very hard. ‘It hit us; it shocked us unexpectedly. Dr Hage Geingob I cannot believe he is not here. I would really like to give enough words of wisdom at this very dark hour in our party and our country,’ Shaningwa said.

Source: The Namibia Press Agency