Department calls for support for those living with autism

The Department of Health has urged families and communities to support individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), also known as autism, to thrive and reach their full potential, and to refrain from discriminating against them.

This as South Afr…


The Department of Health has urged families and communities to support individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), also known as autism, to thrive and reach their full potential, and to refrain from discriminating against them.

This as South Africa joins the global community today to increase awareness about autism and how communities can support autistic people.

Every year, on 2 April, World Autism Awareness Day is celebrated to empower and help autistic people lead a full life.

The day is also used to empower the public, and health and welfare service providers with information, dispel misconceptions, and promote a deeper understanding of autism to help reduce stigma and discrimination by fostering a more inclusive environment for autistic persons and their families.

According to the World Health Organisation (WHO), about one in every 100 children globally has autism.

In South Africa, the Department of Health said local studies have found the prevalence of autism to be between 0.08% and 2%.

‘This
condition is mainly found to be more prevalent in males than females,’ the department said.

Autism can be a life-long condition, but according to the department, through appropriate and tailored support, children and adults with autism can make significant progress and live fulfilling lives.

‘Autistic individuals, as well as their parents and caregivers, often face many challenges, but these do not have to define them because they have the same health needs and rights as the general population. They may, in addition, have specific healthcare needs related to autism or other co-occurring conditions requiring attention, support and care,” the department said.

The department believes that all people, including those with autism, have the right to the enjoyment of the highest attainable standard of physical and mental health.

‘However, autistic people are often subjected to stigma and discrimination, including unjust deprivation of care, education, and opportunities to engage and participate in their communit
ies,’ the department said.

People with ASD have unique physical, social, mental healthcare and educational needs because of their conditions.

This is the reason the department is of the view that this requires strong collaborative efforts with other government departments such as Basic Education and Social Development for the provision of an all-inclusive basket of services for early detection and intervention of ASD to improve their overall health outcomes and lessen long-term suffering and costs of care.

Developmental milestones screening is one of the key interventions to detect disorders like ASD to facilitate early interventions, as studies have shown that the median age of diagnosis of these conditions is between 18 to 24 months.

In South Africa, the Road to Health Booklet or clinic card issued to all children at birth helps parents monitor each child’s health and development until the age of five.

This also assists in early identification and intervention when a child’s development is not in line
with the expected developmental milestones.

Early diagnosis and intervention of autism, the department said, can significantly impact the child’s development and help families understand their child’s strengths and challenges and create a personalised treatment and support plan.

Parents are encouraged to familiarise themselves with the educational information contained in the clinic card.

Although there is no cure for autism spectrum disorders, some medications are used to help people with ASD function better by treating co-occurring symptoms such as high energy levels, inability to focus, or self-harming behaviour, including head banging or hand biting.

Treatment can also help manage co-occurring mental health problems, such as anxiety or depression, and physical conditions such as seizures and sleep problems.

‘If you suspect that you or your family member or child may be having autism spectrum disorder, visit your nearest health care facility or provider for screening and assessment to enable them to p
rovide the necessary interventions, or refer where necessary,’ the department advised.

Source: South African Government News Agency

Arrests for violating traffic laws

More than 1 000 road users have been arrested and 900 vehicles were impounded in law enforcement operations conducted in all nine provinces since the start of the Easter holidays.

The arrests related to various offences, such as drunken driving, prod…


More than 1 000 road users have been arrested and 900 vehicles were impounded in law enforcement operations conducted in all nine provinces since the start of the Easter holidays.

The arrests related to various offences, such as drunken driving, producing false driving documentation, driving recklessly, operating on the roads without driving permits and the overloading of both goods and passengers.

Vehicles were impounded mainly in KwaZulu-Natal and Mpumalanga for violation of public transport operating permits.

A total of 75 961 vehicles were stopped and checked and 916 927 drivers were issued with traffic fines for various infringements.

One of the major concerns during this period was unroadworthy vehicles, and 274 vehicles with defects being discontinued.

‘The Easter weekend is associated with increased traffic volumes as pilgrimages and holiday makers take advantage of the public holidays to visit family or go on vacation. However, this surge in traffic poses significant road safety challenges, with
authorities often warning motorists to exercise caution due to the high volumes of vehicles on the roads.

‘Increased traffic volumes were experienced on Thursday and Friday from approximately 10 am with [the] N1 North and N3 South recording an average of 2 000 vehicles passing through various tollgates per hour. The N4 East recorded 1 900, while N1 South recorded an average of 1 000 vehicles,’ the Road Traffic Management Corporation (RTMC) said.

Meanwhile, South Africa and Botswana are finalising details to identify and repatriate the 46 victims and human remains of Botswana bus crash fatalities, which happened over the Easter long weekend in Limpopo.

‘We will be guided by the people of Botswana, especially the families and the government to say how they prefer this to be done. Post-mortems will be conducted tomorrow. Pathologists will issue a notice then [the Department of] Home Affairs will issue death certificates. Then a funeral parlour will issue a cover letter, requesting the repatriation permit,’ Li
mpopo Health MEC, Doctor Phophi Ramathuba, said on Monday in an interview with the SABC.

Source: South African Government News Agency

Probe into corruption at KZN Sports, Arts and Culture department launched

The Special Investigating Unit (SIU) is expected to commence an investigation into the affairs of the KwaZulu-Natal Sports, Arts and Culture department.

This after President Cyril Ramaphosa signed a proclamation authorising the corruption busting uni…


The Special Investigating Unit (SIU) is expected to commence an investigation into the affairs of the KwaZulu-Natal Sports, Arts and Culture department.

This after President Cyril Ramaphosa signed a proclamation authorising the corruption busting unit to probe allegations of serious maladministration and corruption in that department that took place between 1 January 2020 and 28 March 2024.

‘Proclamation 160 of 2024 authorises the SIU to probe the procurement of and contracting for serious maladministration for the construction of nine libraries and the panel of suppliers for the supply of books.

‘The SIU will also investigate any unauthorised, irregular, fruitless, or wasteful expenditure incurred by the department or the State,’ the SIU said.

According to the unit, the investigation will also delve into the conduct of officials and contractors.

‘The SIU will also investigate any unauthorised, irregular, fruitless, or wasteful expenditure incurred by the department or the State. The scope of the investi
gation also covers any unlawful or improper conduct by department officials or employees, the applicable suppliers or service providers, or any other person or entity which has caused or may cause serious harm to the interests of the public.

‘Furthermore, the investigation will also establish whether there was any unlawful appropriation or expenditure of public money,’ the unit said.

Furthermore, the SIU will look into any systemic failures in the department to prevent any future transgressions.

‘In addition to investigating maladministration, malpractice, corruption and fraud, the SIU will identify system failures and make systematic recommendations to improve measures to prevent future losses.

‘In line with the Special Investigating Units and Special Tribunals Act 74 of 1996 (SIU Act), the SIU will refer any evidence pointing to criminal conduct it uncovers during its investigations to the National Prosecuting Authority [NPA] for further action.

‘The SIU is empowered by the SIU Act to institute a civil
action in the High Court or a Special Tribunal in its name to correct any wrongdoing uncovered during its investigation caused by acts of corruption, fraud, or maladministration,’ the unit said.

Source: South African Government News Agency

Biggest chunk of MURD budget goes to regional and local governments

WINDHOEK: The Ministry of Urban and Rural Development (MURD) has allocated over N.dollars 1.3 billion out of its total budget of N.dollars 2.6 billion to regional and local governments as well as the traditional authorities.

Recently motivating his m…


WINDHOEK: The Ministry of Urban and Rural Development (MURD) has allocated over N.dollars 1.3 billion out of its total budget of N.dollars 2.6 billion to regional and local governments as well as the traditional authorities.

Recently motivating his ministry’s 2024/25 budget, Minister Erastus Uutoni informed parliament that over N.dollars 904 million in subsidies will support the operational and service delivery capacity of regional councils, local authorities, and traditional authorities.

The remaining N.dollars 362 million will be used for revision of the Local Authorities Act of 1992, the Councils of Traditional Leaders Act of 1997 and its Amendment Act No. 31 of 2000, and the Traditional Authorities Act of 2000.

The ministry is also finalising the development of the Urban Land Reform Policy and Strategy, he said.

Uutoni also said the money will be further spent on upgrading and constructing ten open markets in various localities, including Bukalo, Eenhana, Keetmanshoop, Okakarara, Omaruru, Omuthiya, Op
uwo, Oshivelo Settlement, and Outjo.

He said the ministry has also allocated N.dollars 16 million to fund activities related to the decentralisation of additional functions from ministries to regional councils.

‘In addition, over N.dollars 1.04 billion has been allocated towards supporting urban and regional planning, infrastructure, and housing development programmes. This allocation is part of the development budget amounting to N.dollars 1.203 billion,’ he said.

According to Uutoni, the ministry plans to spend N.dollars 360 million on massive urban land servicing countrywide, while N.dollars 193 million will be spent on upgrading informal settlements.

The ministry further allocated N.dollars 221 million for housing delivery through government-funded programmes such as the Mass Housing Development Programme and Build Together Programme and support to the Shack Dwellers Federation of Namibia.

‘The budgetary allocation to this programme will be deployed to sustain and scale up our existing and new policy
initiatives aimed at creating increased and inclusive access to and opportunities for land tenure security and decent housing for our citizens,’ he said.

Source: The Namibia Press Agency

Army confirms minor explosion at farmland in Ikeja Cantonment

The Nigerian Army says a minor explosion occurred in a farmland near the Mammy Market within the Ikeja Cantonment in Lagos on Monday.

This is contained in a statement by the Director Army Public Relations, Maj.-Gen Onyema Nwachukwu, in Abuja.

Nwachu…


The Nigerian Army says a minor explosion occurred in a farmland near the Mammy Market within the Ikeja Cantonment in Lagos on Monday.

This is contained in a statement by the Director Army Public Relations, Maj.-Gen Onyema Nwachukwu, in Abuja.

Nwachukwu said the explosion was suspected to have been triggered by the burning of refuse and other inflammable debris by a farmer who cultivated the farmland.

According to him, no casualty was recorded in the incident.

‘However, given that the cantonment was recently cleared and certified free of unexploded ordnances, we understand that there could be concerns among the general public as a result of the historical antecedent of explosion within the Cantonment.

‘The Nigerian army therefore wishes to assure the public that the situation is under control as its Engineers Explosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD) team has cordoned off the area of the farmland to conduct a thorough investigation into the cause of the explosion.

‘We urge residents in the general area not to pa
nic and assure them of their safety,’ he said.

Source: News Agency of Nigeria

Ezeribe Foundation, GetBundi Technology college train 20 Imo youths in digital skills

The Ezeribe Foundation is to partner with GetBundi College of Technology to train 20 youths from Obowo Local Government Area of Imo in digital skills.

The digital skill education will be undertaken through the GetBundi Education Technology platform, …


The Ezeribe Foundation is to partner with GetBundi College of Technology to train 20 youths from Obowo Local Government Area of Imo in digital skills.

The digital skill education will be undertaken through the GetBundi Education Technology platform, a hybrid digital skills education platform for youths across Africa.

A statement by Mrs Juliet Ijei, the course coordinator for GetBundi, indicated that the four-month training exercise would be on Web Development and Data Analytics.

‘Of the four months, one month shall be committed to onboarding, while three months shall be dedicated to online live classes with a masterclass every month from industry experts.

‘We handhold our students and facilitate their learning process along their curriculum, with monthly performance-based tests that allow them take their theoretical understanding, which is knowledge, and turn it into the practical application, which is skill.

‘Our curriculum is designed to make our students job ready,’ Ijei said.

The fully-funded progra
mme is one of the many ways Ezeribe Foundation is supporting education across Obowo Local Government Area.

‘Recognising the importance of digital skills in today’s job market, Ezeribe Foundation is committed to improving the employability of Obowo youths in helping them to acquire digital skills.

‘Such skills are very crucial for Nigerian youths in today’s world as they enhance employability, foster innovation and promote economic development.

‘The Foundation has further pledged to continue to support the youths in Obowo to acquire skills needed to make them instantly employable.

‘Beyond funding the programme, the foundation is providing functional laptops for each of the trainees with access to the internet .

‘If you’re between 18-35 and from Obowo Local Government Area, you’re eminently qualified for the programme,’ the statement said.

Ijei thanked Ezeribe Foundation for its support to the youths.

‘We believe that Nigerian youths possess the ability and creativity to lead the African digital transfor
mation, if given the best chances to learn.

‘That is why we developed GetBundi platform and crafted the courses to help them learn and commercialise innovation.

‘We are sure this is a life changing opportunity for the beneficiaries. We want more Nigerians to emulate the founders of Ezeribe Foundation and support the youths in their local communities and states.

‘Youth empowerment should not be left for the government alone,’ the statement added.

GetBundi is a hybrid digital skills education institution for African youths and an online STEM education platform for post primary schools.

It delivers high-quality, engaging and accessible education content from proficient educationalist and industry experts across the world.

GetBundi College of Technology is approved by the Federal Ministry of Education in Nigeria and the National Board for Technical Education as a tertiary institution.

Source: News Agency of Nigeria

Constitution Amendment: Why local government autonomy should top agenda

From the early years of Nigeria’s route to into nationhood when Order in Council (London) made laws for it as a Crown Colony, politicians have strived to produce a constitution that meets the citizens’ aspirations.

Right from Clifford Constitution (1…


From the early years of Nigeria’s route to into nationhood when Order in Council (London) made laws for it as a Crown Colony, politicians have strived to produce a constitution that meets the citizens’ aspirations.

Right from Clifford Constitution (1922) to Richards (1946), Macpherson (1951), Lyttleton (1954) down to Independence Constitution and the most recent, the 1999 Constitution, agitation for constitution amendment has never ceased.

Although it is practically impossible to have a perfect constitution however, the more loopholes are noticed in the implementation of any constitution the more the need for its amendment.

Since Nigeria’s return to democracy in 1999, many Nigerians have advocated the review of the 1999 Constitution following observed flaws.

The closest comprehensive effort to that effect was the Goodluck Jonathan administration’s 2014 National Conference whose recommendations were expected to be incorporated into the constitution.

Stakeholders in the political space say this is not unex
pected as the constitution is a product of a military regime.

A former Secretary-General of the Commonwealth, Emeka Anyaoku says the implementation of the 1999 so far has thrown up the need for it to be revisited and points to areas that deserve attention.

He said: ‘The essence of the new constitution should, in recognition of the crucial principle of subsidiarity in every successful federation, involve devolution of powers.

‘This is from the central government to fewer and more viable federating units with strong provisions for inclusive governance at the centre and in the regions as was agreed by Nigeria’s founding fathers.

‘To arrest the ongoing deterioration of the situation in the country and to achieve the desired transformation for the better, we need a system of government that not only addresses our diversity but is also based on a constitution that can correctly be described as a Nigerian people’s Constitution’.

A Senior Advocate of Nigeria (SAN) Robert Clarke also thinks that the status of loc
al governments is among the three key provisions of the 1999 constitution that should be amended.

Other areas, he said, are membership of political parties and independent candidacy.

On Feb. 14, 2024, the Senate listened to the voices of Nigerians and announced a 45-member Constitution Review Committee on the 1999 Constitution, chaired by the Deputy Senate President, Barau Jibrin.

On its part, the House of Representatives hit the ground running by engaging a 9-man team of experts to facilitate the process.

The Deputy Speaker, Rep. Benjamin Kalu, who is also the chairman of the House Committee on the Review of the Constitution said the experience of members of the team was critical in the constitution review process.

‘Among others, they are to analyze and present the data collected in a simple, concise, and organized manner for the committee’s deliberations and consideration to assist in ultimately taking critical and informed decisions.

‘Conduct research on bills, measures, and policies referred to the
committee and advise on their viability and likely consequences for proposed constitutional alterations.

‘They will also advise the committee to arrive at decisions that are fair to all and in accordance with the fundamental objectives and directive principles of state policy,’ Kalu said.

Members of the team include legal luminaries and scholars: Mr Clement Nwankwo, Mr Mamman Osuman, Prof. Nuhu Jamo, a Senior Advocate of Nigeria.

Others are Chief Chris Uche, another Senior Advocate of Nigeria, Mr Seni Adio, also a Senior Advocate of Nigeria, Mr Samson Osagie, Prof. Joy Ezeilo, and Prof. Ladi Hammalia.

While issues such as state police and artificial intelligence are said to top the agenda, some stakeholders have said local government autonomy should be on the front burner of the exercise.

Chief Sam Onuigbo, a former member of the House of Representatives, said recently that fiscal autonomy for local government areas should be guaranteed in the amendment to ensure that the three tiers of government get re
sources to perform their constitutional duties.

He also said without total autonomy for the local governments, it would be difficult for them to have access to funds to perform optimally.

‘Many areas of the constitution deserve a second look. I know that we have been taking it bit by bit in ensuring that we amend the constitution to take care of the challenges we have been having.

‘We should amend the constitution and grant this autonomy so that we can return to what it was then.

‘We need local governments to become fully operational so as to keep the rural people busy and this will go a long way to move governance to the grassroots and reduce criminal activities’, said Onuigbo who is a climate change activist.

He said true autonomy for local governments would ensure that they got their share of national revenue with governors tinkering with its.

Section 7 (1) of the 1999 Constitution clear on local government administration in the country.

‘The system of local government by democratically elected loca
l government councils is under this constitution guaranteed; and accordingly

‘the government of every state shall subject to section 8 of this constitution, ensure their existence under a Law which provides for the establishment, structure, composition, finance and functions of such councils’, it says.

However, state governors have so far exploited the loopholes in certain provisions in that section to deny local governments fiscal autonomy.

For instance, while the constitution says local councils have to participate in economic planning and development of their areas, it went ahead to state that the state houses of assembly should establish an economic planning board for local councils.

Stakeholders like Oniugbo frown at the provision of the constitution that gives power to the state houses of assembly to make laws for the local governments, saying it had crippled their functionality.

This, they say, has render local governments lame ducks.

However, some stakeholders said it became deep-rooted when Nig
eria returned to civil rule in 1999, prompting the then Olusegun Obasanjo administration to establish an 11-man Technical Committee on the Restructuring of Local Government in Nigeria in 2003.

The committee made three major recommendations:

One of its recommendations was the recognition of local government as the autonomous third tier of government in Nigeria.

It also recommended the abolition of the State-Local Government Joint Account; and direct remittance to each council of its share of the Federation Account.

Unfortunately, groundbreaking as they were, the recommendations could not be implemented because they required a constitutional amendment.

When the constitution was eventually reviewed in 2011, state governors blocked attempts to grant full fiscal autonomy to local governments.

The same scenario played out in 2023 when former President Muhammadu Buhari signed 16 constitutional amendment bills into law.

Ironically, one of the amended provisions is Section 121 (3), which now grants explicit fin
ancial independence to houses of assembly and state judiciary.

Stakeholders argue that granting autonomy to arms of government while depriving a constitutionally-recognised tier of government is an unacceptable affront by governors.

At a forum on constitutional review process in 2012, the late Mr Ibrahim Khaleel, then NULGE president, said governors were exploiting the contradictions and confusion in Section 7 of the constitution to abort democratic governance.

He said the ambiguity of that section made it possible for governors to suspend council elections and impose caretaker or transition committees, thereby usurping the statutory functions of local governments and plundering their resources.

Indeed, a recent report shows that local government councils in 17 states are being run through transition or caretaker committees, with Anambra not conducting council polls in 10 years!

Strengthening local government administration may not present a simple and seemingly magical solution to the problem of grassro
ots governance.

However, some stakeholders say being the closest to the people, the lack of fiscal autonomy for the third tier of government is forcing grassroots governance to suffer.

Therefore, some are calling for Section 7 to be repealed and replaced with a fresh chapter on local government administration in order to restore its autonomy status as the third tier of government

They are also calling for the repeal of Section 162 (6) which created the special account called ‘State Joint Local Government Account’ and aids the mismanagement of local government resources by state governments.

Since state governments are reluctant to conduct elections in local councils, some stakeholders are also calling for the removal of the State Independence Electoral Commission from Section 197 (1) (a) and Part II of the Third Schedule.

Instead, they want the power to conduct such elections to be transferred to the Independent National Electoral Commission (INEC).

As usual, it is expected that state governors will res
ist another attempt at granting local governments fiscal autonomy through stooges in their various houses of assembly.

For such an amendment to sail through, it must be approved by resolutions of the House of Assembly of not less than two-thirds of all the states in the federation – that is about 24 states.

The 9-man expert committee has promised do its best to ensure that Nigerians have a befitting constitution.

Uche, a member of the committee spoke the mind of his colleagues at a meeting chaired by Kalu in Abuja recently.

‘We are operating a constitutional democracy and we have seen the hiccups…

‘With our wealth of experience in constitutional engagement and practice we are very certain that some of the things we have come across along the way, we will definitely bring them to bear on our work. So, we assure you, we will put in our best’.

The ball is the court of members of the National Assembly history beckons and how they handle this assignment will determine how history will remember them.

Local G
overnment Councils need to be freed from the shackles of governors and only a constitution that will guarantee this will suffice.

Source: News Agency of Nigeria

Minister seeks mobile courts to free unjustly incarcerated women

Minister of Women Affairs, Uju-Kennedy Ohanenye, says the ministry is working with stakeholders for the establishment of mobile courts to get justice for women incarcerated for years in correctional facilities without trial.

The minister said this in…


Minister of Women Affairs, Uju-Kennedy Ohanenye, says the ministry is working with stakeholders for the establishment of mobile courts to get justice for women incarcerated for years in correctional facilities without trial.

The minister said this in an interview with the News Agency of Nigeria (NAN) on the sidelines of a women empowerment conference to mark the 2024 International Women’s Day, on Tuesday in Abuja.

The conference, organised by Arise Monalisa Foundation in collaboration with One Percent International Management Services Limited, discussed issues affecting women, young female entrepreneurs and children.

Ohanenye said many women awaiting trial over minor offences have been abandoned in correctional facilities for years, with no hope of getting justice.

She said that the establishment of the mobile court would help such women and aid in decongesting the correctional facilities.

‘Remember when I came in as minister and they said women were suffering I had to go to the prison yard, I saw many w
omen abandoned in the prison for over four years awaiting trial over minor issues like owing debt of N10,000, N15,000, N20,000.

‘Out of what I said before on inhumanity to humans, they just drop them there because they feel they don’t have anybody to speak for them, we don’t want that to continue to happen.

‘That’s why I was looking for a mobile court to get these women released, and I went straight to Mr President and I asked for a mobile court and, Mr President said go ahead and gave me a nod,’ she said.

According to the minister, she had contacted the Attorney General of the Federation and state governors to collaborate in the endeavour.

‘I wrote to the governors’ forum and I was called to make a presentation and it was approved and the consent letter was given to me.

‘I need to go now and ensure it’s implemented in all the states,’ Ohanenye added.

She said in spite of some stumbling blocks, she was determined to get the mission accomplished.

‘This is something that could allow our fellow women to b
reathe; this is something that can decongest the prisons.

‘When people said it’s impossible to have a mobile court I said it will be possible, because this is something that will protect the lives of women and children,’ the minister said.

Source: News Agency of Nigeria

Twenty-eight rhinos poached in three months

The Ministry of Environment, Forestry and Tourism (MEFT) has recorded a total of 28 rhinos poached since the beginning of the year.

Meanwhile, no case of elephant poaching was recorded.

In a press statement issued on Monday, MEFT spokesperson Romeo …

The Ministry of Environment, Forestry and Tourism (MEFT) has recorded a total of 28 rhinos poached since the beginning of the year.

Meanwhile, no case of elephant poaching was recorded.

In a press statement issued on Monday, MEFT spokesperson Romeo Muyunda said 19 of the rhinos were poached in the Etosha National Park of which 10 were discovered during dehorning operations throughout March.

Muyunda, also confirmed recent reports of four white rhino poached on a private farm in the Otjozondjupa Region, bringing the total number of rhinos poached on private farms in the country to five, for the year.

Muyunda said three rhinos were poached at rhino custodianship farms, and one in the Kunene Region bringing the overall total to 28 for the year – consisting of 19 black and nine white rhinos.

‘Poaching in Etosha is particularly concerning because this is our flagship park, having a high concentration of rhino conservation and other high-value species making it a major attraction for tourists,’ he said.

He add
ed that based on the current situation and the urgency, an assessment is being undertaken in Etosha to establish the full extent of the problem.

The ministry, he said remains committed to fighting poaching at all costs to ensure it achieves its obligation of protecting the country’s wildlife to benefit the current and future generations of Namibia.

Muyunda further said that to strengthen interventions and sharpen its strategies moving forward, MEFT has called for an urgent high-level meeting with the security clusters to dissect the matter.

He also called on all stakeholders including members of the public to ‘summon their conscience and patriotism’ and join the ministry in this difficult fight against the poaching of high-value species.

He said no arrests were made in the recent cases so far, but cases were opened and investigations continue.

Source: The Namibia Press Agency